Why Not Talk About Diabetes and PCOS?

It’s the end of July, and I have my 3-month endocrinology appointment with a brand new endocrinologist. At this point, I have now had my period for a month. This endocrinologist had been great so far with everything happening with my period and new diagnosis. I was optimistic about liking her, but I wasn’t excited about ...

Confusion for diabetes patients as health regulator ditches its ‘bonkers’ treatment plan

abetes is on the rise in Britain – at a frightening rate. Yet NICE, the health regulator, doesn’t seem to know how best to treat it. Doctors specialising in diabetes described its recent recommendations as ‘bonkers’. And now they’ve forced NICE into an embarrassing U-turn. First, some statistics. In 2010, 3.1 million people over 16 suffered from diabetes, ...

Does pre-diabetes really exist?

Pre-diabetes is an artificial category with virtually zero clinical relevance,’ said an American professor in the Times. A friend of mine has even been told by the vet that her little cat is in a pre-diabetic condition, being a little over the norm on the feline body mass index. I began to think that pre-diabetes was ...

Why obesity predictions are propaganda

o weeks ago I wrote an article for the Spectator in which I argued that obesity predictions are not worth the paper they’re written on and that the healthcare costs of obese people tend to be lower than those of people who are of ‘normal’ weight. Both arguments can be easily backed up with evidence, ...

Eating potatoes often may raise the risk of diabetes during pregnancy

Women who eat more potatoes before they are pregnant may have higher rates of diabetes during pregnancy, according to a studyby the Maryland-based National Institutes of Health. The researchers say that substituting potatoes with other vegetables, legumes or whole grains may help lower the risk of gestational diabetes. The study, which has been published in the BMJ, ...

Full-fat milk ‘protects against type-2 diabetes’

People who drink full-fat rather than skimmed milk are significantly less likely to develop diabetes, a study has suggested. The researchers, from Tufts University in the US, looked at blood samples from over 3,000 participants, taken over a 15-year period, and found that people who drank whole milk were 46 per cent less likely to develop ...